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The Coconut Palm - IELTS Reading Answers

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Coconut Palm Reading is a fascinating topic that involves the interpretation of various signs and symbols on coconut palms. Understanding this topic can help you improve your reading skills and prepare for the test. In this blog post, we will provide you with the best answers for Coconut Palm Reading that will help you sharpen your IELTS Reading abilities and increase your chances of achieving your desired score.

In this blog, we will discuss some important tips to score good bands in the IELTS Reading test. All four sections of the IELTS have equal weight. So, it is important to get good bands in the IELTS reading test. The IELTS reading test includes passages designed to assess your analytical skills, reading comprehension, and language proficiency.

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Table of Contents

Coconut Palm Reading Passage

One of the important passages is the coconut palm IELTS, and the passage is given below:

Paragraph 1

For millennia, the coconut has been central to the lives of Polynesian and Asian peoples. In the Western world, on the other hand, coconuts have always been exotic and unusual, sometimes rare. The Italian merchant traveller Marco Polo saw coconuts in South Asia in the late 13th century. Among the mid-14th-century travel writings of Sir John Mandeville, there is mention of ‘Great Notes of Ynde’ (great Nuts of India). Today, images of palm-fringed tropical beaches are clichés in the West to sell holidays, chocolate bars, fizzy drinks, and romance.

Paragraph 2

The coconut palm has a smooth, slender, grey trunk, up to 30 metres tall. This is an important source of timber for building houses and is increasingly being used as a replacement for endangered hardwoods in the furniture construction industry. The trunk is surmounted by a rosette of leaves, each of which may be up to six metres long.

The leaves have hard veins in their centres which, in many parts of the world, are used as brushes after the green part of the leaf has been stripped away. Immature coconut flowers are tightly clustered among the leaves at the top of the trunk. The flower stems may be tapped for their sap to produce a drink, and the sap can also be reduced by boiling to produce a type of sugar used for cooking.

Paragraph 3

Coconut palms produce as many as seventy fruits per year, weighing more than a kilogram each. The wall of the fruit has three layers: a waterproof outer layer, a fibrous middle layer and a hard inner layer. The thick fibrous middle layer produces coconut fibre, ‘coir’, which has numerous uses and is particularly important in manufacturing ropes.

The woody innermost layer, the shell, with its three prominent ‘eyes’, surrounds the seed. An important product obtained from the shell is charcoal, widely used in various industries and the home as a cooking fuel. The shells are also used as bowls in many parts of Asia when broken in half.

Paragraph 4

The nutrients (endosperm) of the developing seed needs are inside the shell. Initially, the endosperm was a sweetish liquid, coconut water, enjoyed as a drink but also provided the hormones that encourage other plants to grow more rapidly and produce higher yields.

As the fruit matures, the coconut water solidifies to form the brilliant white, fat-rich, edible flesh or meat. Dried coconut flesh, ‘copra’, is made into coconut oil and coconut milk, which are widely used in cooking in different parts of the world and in cosmetics. A derivative of coconut fat, glycerine, acquired strategic importance in a quite different sphere, as Alfred Nobel introduced the world to his nitroglycerine-based invention: dynamite.

Paragraph 5

Their biology would appear to make coconuts the great maritime voyagers and coastal colonisers of the plant world. The large, energy-rich fruits can float in water and tolerate salt but cannot remain viable indefinitely; studies suggest they can no longer germinate after about 110 days at sea. Cast onto desert island shores, with little more than sand to grow in and exposed to the full glare of the tropical sun, coconut seeds can germinate and root.

The air pocket in the seed, created as the endosperm solidifies, protects the embryo. In addition, the fibrous fruit wall that helped it to float during the voyage stores moisture that the roots of the coconut seedling can take up as it starts to grow.

Paragraph 6

There have been centuries of academic debate over the origins of the coconut. There were no coconut palms in West Africa, the Caribbean or the east coast of the Americans before the voyages of the European explorers Vasco da Gama and Columbus in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. 16th-century trade and human migration patterns reveal that Arab traders and European sailors will likely have moved coconuts from South and Southeast Asia to Africa and then across the Atlantic to America’s east coast.

But the origin of coconuts discovered along the west coast of America by 16th-century sailors has been the subject of centuries of discussion. Two opposing origins have been proposed: they came from Asia or were native to America. Both suggestions have problems. In Asia, there is much coconut diversity and evidence of millennia of human use – but no relatives are growing in the wild. There are close coconut relatives in America, but no evidence that coconuts are indigenous. These problems have led to the intriguing suggestion that coconuts originated on coral islands in the Pacific and were dispersed from there.

How To Crack IELTS Exam In 15 days?

The Coconut Palm Questions

Questions 1 - 8 (Completing notes with ONE WORD ONLY)

1: timber for houses and the making of  ______

2. stems provide sap, used as a drink or a source of  _________

3. used for  __________ etc. 

4. a source of ________

5. (when halved) for _________

6. a source of _______ for other plants.

7.  oil and milk for cooking and ________

8. glycerine (an ingredient in ________ )

Answers for 1 - 8

1. Furniture

Explanation: The coconut palm has a smooth, slender, grey trunk, up to 30 metres tall. This is an important source of timber for building houses and is increasingly being used as a replacement for endangered hardwoods in the furniture construction industry. (Sentences 1-3, Paragraph 2). 

The lines say coconut tree trunks are used to make furniture and house timber.

2. Sugar

Explanation: Immature coconut flowers are tightly clustered among the leaves at the top of the trunk. The flower stems may be tapped for their sap to produce a drink, and the sap can also be reduced by boiling to produce a type of sugar used for cooking. (Sentences 5-6, Paragraph 2)

The lines say coconut flower sap can be used as sugar.

3. Ropes

Explanation: The thick fibrous middle layer produces coconut fibre, ‘coir’, which has numerous uses and is particularly important in manufacturing ropes. (Sentence 3, Paragraph 3)

The thick fibre of the coconut palm produces ‘coir,’ which is used to make ropes.

4. Charcoal

Explanation: The woody innermost layer, the shell, with its three prominent ‘eyes’, surrounds the seed. An important product obtained from the shell

is charcoal, widely used in various industries and the home as a cooking fuel.(Sentences 4-5, Paragraph 3)

The lines state that charcoal is produced from coconut shells.

5. Bowls

Explanation: When broken in half, the shells are also used as bowls in many parts of Asia.(Sentence 6, Paragraph 3)

The author mentions that the shells are used as bowls when broken in half, particularly in many parts of Asia.

6. Hormones

Explanation: Initially, the endosperm is a sweetish liquid, coconut water, enjoyed as a drink but also provides the hormones that encourage other plants to grow more rapidly and produce higher yields. (Sentence 2, Paragraph 4)

The line states that coconut water is consumed as a beverage, and other plants also use its hormones to promote rapid growth.

7. Cosmetics

Explanation: Dried coconut flesh, ‘copra’, is made into coconut oil and coconut milk, which are widely used in cooking in different parts of the world and in cosmetics. (Sentence 4, Paragraph 4)

The line states that coconut flesh is used in cosmetics and cooking.

8. Dynamite

Explanation: A derivative of coconut fat, glycerine, acquired strategic importance in a quite different sphere, as Alfred Nobel introduced the world to this nitroglycerine-based invention: dynamite. (Sentence 5, Paragraph 4)

The line states that Dynamite’s primary explosive component is glycerine.

Questions 9 -13 (TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN)

9. Coconut seeds need shade in order to germinate.

10. Coconuts were probably transported to Asia from America in the 16th century.

11. Coconuts found on the west coast of America were a different type from those found on the east coast.

12. All the coconuts found in Asia are cultivated varieties.  

13. Coconuts are cultivated in different ways in America and the Pacific.

Answers with explanation (9 - 13)

9. False 

Explanation: Cast onto desert island shores, with little more than sand to grow in and exposed to the full glare of the tropical sun, coconut seeds can germinate and root. (Sentence 3, Paragraph 5)

Contrary to the statement, coconut seeds germinate without shade.

10. False

Explanation: There were no coconut palms in West Africa,  in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. 16th-century trade and human migration patterns reveal that Arab traders and European sailors will likely have moved coconuts from South and Southeast Asia to Africa and then across the Atlantic to America’s east coast. (Sentences 1-2, Paragraph 6)

These lines state that the route for transporting coconuts in the 16th century was not directly from Asia to America but from Asia to Africa and then to America.

11. Not Given

Explanation: The paragraph does not compare local coconut varieties.

12. True

Explanation: In Asia, there is much coconut diversity and evidence of millennia of human use – but no relatives are growing in the wild. (Sentence 7, paragraph 6)

These lines suggest that Asia had no wild varieties, only cultivated ones.

13. Not Given
Explanation: The passage does not mention how coconuts are grown.

IELTS Academic vs IELTS General Exam

Tips to Prepare for IELTS Reading

A key element in assessing your ability to comprehend and interpret written facts is the reading segment of the IELTS. To score well on the IELTS reading section, you need English proficiency. But, you also need to understand analysing and interpreting texts. 

Here are a few guidelines to help you prepare for the IELTS reading section:

  • Pay attention to details while reading
  • Improve your vocabulary
  • Work on analysis 
  • Focus on keywords
  • Practise regularly 

Conclusion

The IELTS reading section is crucial as it evaluates the ability of the test taker to read, process, and analyse the information. To get good scores in IELTS reading you have to be good at analysing and comprehending the text. You have to answer 40 questions in 60 minutes. This makes the IELTS Reading test hard due to time limits.

Securing good scores in IELTS is important but there are various other things you have to go through such as shortlisting universities, applying to universities, getting visas, finding scholarships, and a lot more. If you feel overwhelmed with these steps and want to know more about how to score high bands in the IELTS examination, reach out to Yocket. Yocket experts will help you streamline your preparation and will guide you through the complex process of studying abroad. Connect with Yocket experts today to make your study abroad journey smooth.

FAQ's on The Coconut Palm Reading Answers

What skills does the IELTS Coconut Palm passage analyse?

Do coconut seeds need shade in order to germinate?

What are some tips for choosing the correct answers in the IELTS Reading test?

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What should be my approach while practising Coconut Palm Passage?

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